Repartitioning A Linux Volume (Disk Drive)

Our huge IBM 4U RAID-10 rackmount e-server needs at least one set of its disks repartitioned.  This system runs our general ledger system, which includes payroll.

Please do not ask me why the vendor did not fully partition the disks two years ago, when the brand new system was installed. Now, they have to perform the repartition, according to our support agreement. I believe we are going to use a tool called parted.

Well, anyway, a full set of instructions and experiences will come out of this. Please stay tuned.

12/7/2009

—————-

Spoke with person who will do the repartitioning, and he will use fdisk, not parted. The repartitioning takes place tomorrow morning, and I will have more information then.

12/9/2009

—————-

The repartitioning was a huge success. Because we are running Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES 4, gparted would not work and could not successfully be installed.

Instead, the technician from our general ledger vendor performed the resizing by carving out a new, larger partition with fdisk, copying the under-sized partition’s contents to the new partition, and deleting the old partition with changing fstab settings in between.

The lessons we have learned from this are as follows: when our server was spec’ed out, we should have gotten serial attached SCSI disks all the same [larger] size. As it is we have a set of disks that are 74GB and another set 146GB. That is more money, but we lost our general ledger for 2/3 of our working day, and our vendor does not do this work on weekends or before/after business hours.

The other lesson learned was when the system was being installed at the beginning, all disks should have been fully paritioned at the time.

But, I am not complaining for having had a successful day.

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